Modular Graphics Card

Modular Graphics Card design by Dave Delisle davesgeekyideas

I currently own a Nvidia GTX 960 card and I’m in the market for a new graphics card*. In a perfect world I could just add 4GB of RAM and some quieter fans to my existing card, which would set me up for a few more years, but this just isn’t possible. So that got me thinking, why aren’t graphics cards modular?

Doug Bluetooth Speaker

Doug-Dog-UP-pixar-vinyl-toy-bluetooth-speaker-alexa-design-design-2018-dave-delisle-davesgeekyideas

This is Doug the talking dog from Pixar’s UP. The speaker is the nose, the controls and indicator light are on his collar. He could say his more popular phrases (I LOVE YOU or SQUIRREL) on demand. This could also be an Alexa device if Amazon ever decides to make themed gadgets.

Hockey Rec Room Design

Hockey Rec Room Design by Dave Delisle davesgeekyideas

This is an old design that I’m bringing over from my hockey blog. It is the hockey pad of my dreams! The centerpiece of the design is a floating entertainment unit that is mounted onto a wall (adorned with a crowd mural) that looks like an NHL scoreboard, this is where the TV sits.

Hitchhiker’s Guide Amazon Alexa Design

Hitchhikers-Guide-Tablet-Amazon-Alexa-Echo-Dot-Kindle-Fire-2018-design-by-Dave-Delisle

Amazon recently announced several new Alexa devices so I thought I would make one that is inspired by Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, at least the one seen in the movie (which used voice commands for queries). I sort of got carried away and made 5 devices in one package, see below. 

Doctor Strange Smartwatch

Doctor Strange Time Stone Smartwatch Apple design by Dave Delisle davesgeekyideas

I’ve been meaning to do a Time Stone watch or clock for a few years now, but I couldn’t think of a way to capture the green time effects. A round smartwatch display could handle that, so I made this design. The Time Stone is a button that activates the display. The red strap represents Doctor Strange’s cape.

Intel Compute Stick Design

Intel Pentium 2 Chip compute stick design by Dave Delisle

A few years ago Intel released the Compute Stick, a small computer that was about the size of a USB thumb drive or a pack of gum. I thought it was pretty neat to have a desktop PC in such a compact form.

If it were up to me, a new version would look like the old Pentium 2 or Pentium 3 chips, which had an appearance similar to a video game cartridge. This new Compute Stick would be larger, roughly the same size as the aforementioned Pentium chips.

The holographic sticker would serve as the power button. An array of ports would be available on both sides.

I’m not a fan of the original Compute Stick’s HDMI connector, which had the computer plug directly into a display (like a Roku or Amazon Fire stick). This can be a problem if the HDMI port on the display is difficult to access or is flush against the wall. I prefer an HDMI cable between the computer and display, which makes the power button easier to access.